Stolen Jars + Fraternal Twin

Stolen Jars + Fraternal Twin

Stolen Jars:

Each track on glint, Stolen Jars’ visual EP, starts with an impossibly small sound – a keyboard briefly glimmering in warm light, a finger sliding down the neck of a guitar, a chord strummed with just enough space in between the strings that each note sounds alone.

These are the small spaces from which Cody Fitzgerald starts. Fitzgerald, the group’s songwriter and center of gravity, started writing as Stolen Jars in 2011, and in its evolution, his small and intricate introductions have grown into full and powerful statements. glint finds beauty in brief moments of reflection, elongating them with deft chamber orchestration, sorrowfully penned lyrics, and vocal performances from Fitzgerald and collaborator Molly Grund that guide each track from tension to reconciliation and back again.

Following the success of 2015’s sophomore LP Kept – NPR’s Bob Boilen named Stolen Jars as one of his top ten bands to watch at CMJthe Deli Magazine featured the band on the cover of its CMJ issue, Stereogum and Consequence of Sound premiered the album’s singles, and the Village Voice ran a feature on the band’s songwriting practice – Fitzgerald sees glint as a lens for his collaborative process. A constellation of musicians orbits the band – vocalists Molly Grund and Sarah Coffey, drummer Matt Marsico, guitarists Connor McGuigan and Peter Enriquez, and keyboard players Grant Meyer and Max Finkelstein make contributions to Stolen Jars and push the band’s energy to its outer edges during live shows.

glint, thematically unified along lines of loss, reflection, and renewal, breaks apart into different visual interpretations. Each track on the EP plays alongside a composition from different video artists, animators, choreographers, and directors – Evelyn Ross for “Eliot,” Jenelle Pearring and Nora Alami for “Gold Age,” Abie Sidell and Felix Handte for “Long New York,” Marissa Goldman and Blaine Dunkley for “Gone Away,” and Henry Chaisson for “Afterlight.”

Alongside his work with Stolen Jars, Fitzgerald has a publishing deal with SONGS Music Publishing and a burgeoning film scoring career, including credits on feature films The Rewrite and Hard Sell, and Open 24 Hours, a short film that premiered at Cannes in 2015. Music from Stolen Jars has also appeared in the film (How To Be Single) and TV spots (Apple’s “Do It All” iPad commercial).

As Stolen Jars moves forward, it becomes both more frenetic and more precise. Small sounds become larger, Fitzgerald’s compositions grow ever-more intricate, and different collaborators bend the project in new directions. glint may hone in on little moments, but Stolen Jars’ future is very big.

Fraternal Twin:

For the past several years, Tom Christie has been arranging an ever-twisting and shifting song of his own. Beginning in New York’s Hudson Valley where he grew up, Tom fleshed out the soft and intricate songs that became the first Fraternal Twin album ‘Skin Gets Hot.’ Released quietly in the spring of 2015, the album passed from fan to fan and developed a cult reputation based on its uniquely intimate display of raw emotion.

Around this time, Christie got together a steady backing band comprised of Max Restaino on drums and David Grimaldi on bass. Together, they formed a much-needed backbone for the songs that Tom was writing while moving back and forth between upstate New York and a newly-adopted home in New Jersey. Before the year was done they were back in the studio at Salvation Recording Co. (New Paltz, NY) with engineer/producer Chris Daly along with past collaborators Leslie Bear (Long Beard), Aaron Maine (Porches) and Silas Reidy (Izzy True) to record the follow-up to ‘Skin Gets Hot.’As it turns out, ‘

As it turns out, ‘Homeworlding’ is an impressively natural progression from their debut. In the span of just under a half hour, we hear Fleetwood Mac-indebted pop songs, Tom Verlaine-esque guitar leads, ambient composition and watery folk songs quickly passing by in a way that demands repeat listens in order to fully comprehend the depth of the lyrics and songwriting. And while these components all seem disparate on paper, they’re tied together by a very specific sensibility. You could call it an astral peace or a zen headspace, but the commonality throughout ‘Homeworlding’ is the acceptance of the vast world around you and the fact that your own fate is nearly always out of your control. The wind tugs at your arm—or the thing you threw rolls right back.. and all you can do is just let it happen.